Vivian Medina, DDS

Dr. Vivian Medina is a graduate of Creighton University. After working as an associate for several years, she opened a private practice in 1993.

Read more about Vivian Medina, DDS

3630 Madaca Ln.,
Tampa, FL 33618
(813) 264-0286
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Posts for: August, 2014

CrownsPreservetheToothWhileOfferingGreaterProtectionThanaFilling

The preferred outcome when treating a tooth for decay is to preserve it. If the disease is still in its early stages, we can accomplish this effectively by removing diseased tissue and then restoring the remaining tooth with filling material.

There comes a point, however, when filling a tooth isn’t the best option. If it has already received several fillings, the tooth may have become too weak to receive another. Additionally, a filling may not be enough protection from further fracture or infection for teeth weakened from trauma or abnormal tooth wear or in the event a root canal treatment is necessary.

While a diseased tooth can be extracted and replaced with a durable and aesthetically pleasing dental implant, there may be another option to consider — installing a crown. Like a filling, a crown preserves what remains of a natural tooth, but with better protection, life expectancy and appearance than a filling.

Known also as a cap, a crown completely covers or “caps” a natural tooth. They’re produced in a variety of styles and materials to match the function and appearance of the capped tooth and adjacent teeth. Crowns made of porcelain are ideally suited for visible teeth because of their resemblance to tooth enamel. A less visible tooth that endures more biting force (like a back molar) may need the strength of a precious metal like gold or new-age porcelains that can also withstand significant biting forces. There are also hybrid crowns available that combine the strength of metal for biting surfaces and the life-like appearance of porcelain for the more visible areas of a tooth.

To prepare a tooth for a crown, we first remove any decayed structure and add bonding material to strengthen what remains. We then make a mold of the tooth and bite, which is typically sent to a dental technician as a guide for creating the permanent crown. Recent advances with digital technology have also made it possible to mill the permanent crown out of porcelain in the dental office while you wait.

After the permanent crown is received and permanently bonded to the tooth, you will have a protected and fully functional tooth. From this point on it’s important for you to clean and care for it as you would any other tooth since the underlying tooth is still at risk for decay. The good news is your tooth has been saved with a bonus — a long-term solution that’s also smile-transforming.

If you would like more information on crowns and other tooth restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crowns & Bridgework.”


IronChefCatCoraDiscussesHerPositiveDentalImplantExperience

Cat Cora is a world-class chef, restaurateur, best-selling author, and philanthropist — on top of being the first female chef on the hit television show Iron Chef America. She is also the mother of four active young sons. And while all these important roles require her daily attention, she makes oral health a top priority for herself and her family through diet, brushing, flossing and routine visits to the dentist.

During a recent interview with Dear Doctor magazine, Cat revealed that she had her wisdom teeth removed when she was in her thirties and another tooth extracted and replaced with a dental implant. When asked to compare the two experiences, Cat said that the implant was “much easier for me.” She went on to say, “It feels very natural” and “now, I don't even think about it.”

Some may be surprised by Cat's response; however, we find it to be a quite common one.

There is no question that over the last two decades, dental implants have revolutionized tooth replacement and the field of dentistry. A dental implant, used to replace missing teeth, is placed in the jawbone with a minor surgical procedure. What's amazing is that over time these dental implants actually fuse with or integrate into the bone, thus making them an ideal permanent solution for replacing a missing tooth. They are typically made of commercially pure titanium, a substance that has been used for medical and dental implants for years. The crown, the part above the gum tissues, is attached to the implant via a retaining screw and a connecting piece called an abutment. The crown itself is artistically crafted using porcelain to mimic the look and feel of a natural tooth — just as Cat Cora describes.

To learn more about dental implants, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants, Your Third Set of Teeth.” Or you can contact us today to schedule an appointment so that we can conduct a thorough examination and discuss what treatment options will be best for you. And to read the entire interview with Cat Cora, please see the article “Cat Cora.”


By Vivian Medina, DDS
August 01, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dental care   oral health  
UseaRiskManagementApproachforDentalCareSuccess

As our profession advances, we dental professionals continue to find the biggest factor for successful outcomes is an informed patient. The more you know about your own teeth and gums, the greater your chance for a healthy outcome.

Regular dental care is fundamental to becoming informed. Your regular office visits and cleanings are an opportunity for us to “get real” — for you to learn the unvarnished truth about your dental issues and the reasons why you need to consider some options regarding your oral health. We also need to be just as realistic about what can or can’t be done to improve your situation and the cost involved.

The best way to approach this is to develop a plan based on managing risk. Risk is essentially weighing anything we may potentially lose against the solutions for not losing it. In dentistry, we look at risk in four basic areas: periodontal, the threats to structures like gums, ligaments and bone that support the teeth; biomechanical, the threats to the structural integrity of teeth such as decay, enamel erosion or fracture; functional, problems that can arise with how the teeth, muscles and jaw joints work together; and aesthetic, the impact of all these threats to the outward appearance of your smile.

Once we know the risks you’re facing, we then determine the best treatment approach for managing the risk based on costs and potential outcomes. For example, if you’re diagnosed with gum disease, you’re at risk for losing supporting bone and, ultimately, the affected teeth. Our primary goal is to prevent that loss from occurring through plaque and calculus removal that slow or stop the disease and allow affected tissues to heal. But if the disease has advanced and you’ve already experienced bone or even tooth loss, we may then need to modify our treatment goal by including gum surgery or tooth replacement options like dental implants.

Using a risk management approach helps us identify what needs to be treated and the most reasonable and achievable options for treating it. The foundation for this approach is prevention — stopping problems before they start or progress. Developing and maintaining this kind of action plan will help reduce your ultimate costs — emotional, social and financial.

If you would like more information on dental treatment planning, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Successful Dental Treatment.”




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